Shark Fin Initiative

Save Our Ocean and Be Part of the Solution!

Sharks are harvested worldwide, sometimes for their meat, but also for an even more lucrative fin trade centred in Hong Kong and the Greater China region.
A Thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) is fatally caught in a fishing net, Mexico.  / ©: Brian J. Skerry / National Geographic Stock / WWF
A Thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) is fatally caught in a fishing net, Mexico.
© Brian J. Skerry / National Geographic Stock / WWF

Consumption of Sharks and Their Fins

Increasing numbers of shark species are threatened with extinction, being listed either on the The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List, or the Appendices of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). In 1996 only 15 shark and related species were considered threatened; this has soared by 12 times in only a decade and by 2010 over 180 species were considered threatened. The demand for sharks and particularly their fins has been one of the main factors driving global shark fisheries.

The sustainability of consuming shark products such as shark fin has long been of global concern and Hong Kong is one of the greatest consumers of shark fin. Unfortunately there is only one small sustainable shark fishery in global terms, and the development of sustainable fisheries for sharks is likely to be far too slow to effectively conserve shark populations in most parts of the world. Other actions will be necessary to conserve sharks. As such, we are asking the public to stop eating shark fin at this time.

WWF-Hong Kong has been promoting and educating the public on sustainable seafood. We have been engaging caterers and corporations in Hong Kong not to serve and consume shark fin soup respectively.

Support us

If your restaurant is interested to join the Alternative Shark-free Menu Programme or serve other sustainable seafood, please email us.

If your corporate is interested to sign the No Shark Fin Corporate Pledge, please fill in the online form
 / ©: WWF-Hong Kong
"Saving Shark" leaftlet