Flap your wings and create your own bird travelogue! | WWF Hong Kong


Flap your wings and create your own bird travelogue! 
	© WWF-Hong Kong

It’s time to fly! 

Each year, different types of migrating waterbirds travel along the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF), encountering numerous challenges during their long journey. While it’s hard to list them all out, here is your chance to be one of them!
In keeping with this year’s Walk for Nature theme “Flap your Wings”, we invite you to create your own bird travelogue using one of the five migratory waterbirds listed below.

Share your bird travelogue in writing or illustration and send it along with your personal details (Name, HKID No., contact no. or email address) to walk@wwf.org.hk.

The top 3 winners of “A Little Migrating Bird’s Travelogue” Competition will enjoy FREE admission to our 2018 “Walk for Nature” event with your family and friends. Come and experience the real journey with migrating birds!

Prizes: 
Champion: Free admission to a Group of 4 people to join the 2018 “Walk for Nature” event
1st runner up: Free admission to a Group of 3 people to join the 2018 “Walk for Nature” event
2nd runner up: Free admission to a Group of 2 people to join the 2018 “Walk for Nature” event
 
Terms and Conditions:
  • The campaign is open for entries until 10 October 2018 11:59pm
  • Entrants should share their work along with their personal information (i.e. Name, HKID no., Contact no. or email address) to walk@wwf.org.hk
  • Submissions should be Original works
  • In case of any dispute relating to the campaign, the final decision rests with WWF.
  • Competition results will be announced through the 2018 “Walk for Nature” official website and winners will be contacted by telephone or email on 15 October 2018. 
 

Pied Avocet

Pied Avocet 
	© WWF-Hong Kong
Pied Avocet
© WWF-Hong Kong
Focus on your target
How does a bird with an upturned bill catch prey? Let’s have a look at the pied avocet’s thin, long and upturned bill. Once it lowers its head, the tip of its bill becomes parallel to the mud surface,  allowing it to easily pick up small organisms such as small fish, shrimps, molluscs and insects. 
Fun fact: They like standing in shallow water to have their meals

Northern Pintail

Northern Pintail 
	© Neil Fifer
Northern Pintail
© Neil Fifer
A funny upside-down bird
We rarely see overhead kicks in football matches but it is easy to see a diving bird at play in Deep Bay. The northern pintail has a narrow and long neck and a long and pointed tail that gives it a slender figure. They are commonly found in open lowland grassland, prairie or shallow water areas, feeding on submerged aquatic vegetation and invertebrates. While feeding, it turns upside down, submerging the upper part of its body.
Fun fact: Measuring the size of about 3 to 4 soft drink cans, the northern pintail can travel from Siberia to Hong Kong in about 14 days with a maximum speed of 100km/h

Black-faced Spoonbill

Black-faced Spoonbill 
	© Wayne Wu
Black-faced Spoonbill
© Wayne Wu
Be a better me 
Dangerous places can also be the best breeding sites! The black-faced spoonbill, which has a signature long spoon-like bill, lives in the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea. These stylish birds always stick together to groom one another, keeping themselves in top shape. Unfortunately, the black-faced spoonbill is a globally endangered species!
Fun fact: Black-faced spoonbills don’t need to rest during their migratory flight thousands of miles away from the Korean demilitarized zone to Hong Kong.

Black-tailed godwit

Black-tailed godwit 
	© John and Jemi Holmes
Black-tailed godwit
© John and Jemi Holmes
A “picky” bird
Picky does not apply to children only. The black-tailed godwit does not like fish but feasts on worms, insects and molluscs on mudflats. Although it is widespread and its wintering populations can be found in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Australasia, they have been declining globally and now qualifiy as a near threatened species.
Fun fact: The black-tailed godwit’s bill is very long and straight but is not upturned.

Great Cormorant

Great Cormorant 
	© Neil Fifer
Great Cormorant
© Neil Fifer
An excellent helper
Have you ever seen a bird with hair on its head? Great Cormorants have them but unlike humans, white feathers do not signify old age but is a sign of attractiveness. That’s why breeding adults sport plenty of white feathers. With metallic black-coloured feathers on its body, a yellow throat and blue-green eyes, the 77 to 94cm-tall bird indeed looks handsome. This winter, let’s have a date in Mai Po with this good-looking bird!
Fun fact: Great cormorants are good helpers of fishermen because of their excellent fish-catching skills