Shui Hau Conservation in Focus | WWF Hong Kong

Shui Hau Conservation in Focus



Posted 19 October 2018
Clam digging activities has severely damaged the biodiversity of Shui Hau Wan. 
These activities are disruptive and puts stress on the eco-system in the area.
Clam digging activities has severely damaged the biodiversity of Shui Hau Wan. These activities are disruptive and puts stress on the eco-system in the area.
© WWF-Hong Kong
The negative impact of recreational clam digging activities at Shui Hau is the focus of a new two-year ECF Sustainable Shui Hau project, launched by WWF-Hong Kong with the support of the government’s Environment and Conservation Fund (ECF) and the Environmental Campaign Committee. Shui Hau is one of the seven sites of marine conservation priority highlighted by WWF as part of its recent Sea for Future campaign.
 
“The ECF Sustainable Shui Hau project aims to preserve the biodiversity of the area,” said WWF-Hong Kong Project Manager Lydia Pang. “WWF will engage academics and local villagers to draft a code of conduct for recreational clam digging and develop a set of toolsto reduce its negative impact. A group of 30 team scientists, together with volunteer survey teams trained and recruited by WWF, will conduct baseline ecological surveys to raise awareness of the area’s rich biodiversity. Eco visits to Shui Hau, at which the public will learn about the history and ecological importance of the area, will be organised on weekends in the coming months.”  
 
Shui Hau comprises several coastal habitats, including marshes, mangroves, intertidal sand and mud flats, boulder shores and rocky shores, supporting over 180 species. Unregulated clam digging in the area is a serious concern. Large Asiatic hard clams have all but disappeared and the activity and can lead to juvenile horseshoe crabs being trampled. To preserve the area’s ecological value and ensure the long-term sustainability of Hong Kong’s coastal resources, WWF together with academics, fishermen, conservationists and experts has suggested a 50-hectare area for conservation.
 
WWF believes that 5% (currently designated and planned) of Hong Kong’s waters as marine protected areas (MPA) by 2023 is not enough.To protect the existing marine life and habitats from increasing threats, WWF urges the government to protect 10% of Hong Kong waters as MPAs by 2020, and 30% by 2030.
 
 
Read more about the conservation significance, threats, and suggested measures in our Conservation Priority Sites for Hong Kongadvocacy booklet here: https://www.wwf.org.hk/MPA_Booklet2018_en
 
To register for volunteer teams and public tours at Shui Hau, visit our website: https://www.wwf.org.hk/sustainable_shuihau/en.  



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Clam digging activities has severely damaged the biodiversity of Shui Hau Wan. 
These activities are disruptive and puts stress on the eco-system in the area.
Clam digging activities has severely damaged the biodiversity of Shui Hau Wan. These activities are disruptive and puts stress on the eco-system in the area.
© WWF-Hong Kong Enlarge
The ECF Sustainable Shui Hau project is sponsored by the Environment and Conservation Fund and the Environmental Campaign Committee.
The ECF Sustainable Shui Hau project is sponsored by the Environment and Conservation Fund and the Environmental Campaign Committee.
© WWF-Hong Kong Enlarge
The project engages three local stalls to educate and encourage the public to follow the code of conduct with proper digging tools.
The project engages three local stalls to educate and encourage the public to follow the code of conduct with proper digging tools.
© WWF-Hong Kong Enlarge