Mai Po Community Engagement | WWF Hong Kong


 
	© Philippe Li

Mai Po Community

The Peter Scott Field Studies Centre in the village outside Mai Po Nature Reserve welcomes students, teachers, public visitors, families and community groups as well as dedicated researchers and birdwatchers, all of whom are our local Mai Po community. The facility and community also welcomes international researchers and educators, being a key training facility for both wetland managers and those involved in the protection of wetlands across the region. We are connecting our community to nature.

With the generous support of a capital funding grant from the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, WWF is embarking on a project to rebuild the Peter Scott Centre to meet the needs of our Mai Po Community, whilst bringing the facility up to today’s environmental and building safety standards. The project is aligned to goals under the UN Convention for Biological Diversity to deliver a 21st Century Nature Classroom by 2021.
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Connect 2 Nature - Mai Po Community
© WWF-Hong Kong
Mai Po Community Survey
The new Peter Scott Field Studies Centre is being planned with the needs of the Mai Po Community in mind – from design concept through to construction and then to its future operation. The centre will be accessible to all visitors including those with disabilities. Universal accessibility features, including tactile and auditory experiences, will be provided to empower everyone to learn about wetlands and biodiversity.

The Peter Scott rebuild can enhance capacity for wetland training and research, providing space for community forums and workshops. This can bring groups together to tackle threats to biodiversity and the issues surrounding the protection of Deep Bay wetlands and the East Asian-Australasian Flyway.

The below presentations cover the ongoing design work for three components in the Mai Po Nature Reserve infrastructure upgrade and improvement programme, scheduled to commence construction from April 2020, with the building of two bird hides and a one-kilometre natural boardwalk to replace the existing footpath and provide universal access facilities. The presentations also cover the design work for the new Peter Scott Field Studies Centre.